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NZ Slang Words, And What They Mean To Us NZ Slang Words, And What They Mean To Us

Posted on by Lesley Armstrong

Sweet As: This is one of the most common NZ slang terms and means "that's OK" or "I agree" or "I understand".  e.g. you say to your friend "I can't make it over to your place today, sorry" and they reply "Sweet as".

Wop wops: Out in the countryside, usually far from civilisation. e.g. "oh he lives out in the wop wops, somewhere east of Opotiki".

Cuz or Cuzzie or Cuzzie bro: Our word for cousin, but also used when referring to good friends, e.g. "g'day cuz!"

Gumboots: Our name for Wellingtons, or rubber boots, the ones you wear on a farm or when working in the freezing works.

Freezing Works: Abbatoir.

Puku: (not slang but an everyday NZ word) Maori word for tummy, stomach. e.g. "Ohh he's got a huge puku!"  

Kai: (not slang but ​an everyday NZ word) Maori word for food.

Plasters: Bandaids, wound strips.

Tramping: Hiking.

Muppet: Idiot. e.g. "He crashed his car, the muppet!"

Bach: Pronounced as "batch" and means a simple holiday home, usually by the sea or lake.

Crib: South Island name for a Bach.

Gizalook: Give me a look.

Sook: a cry-baby or wimp e.g. "Don't be such a sook, it only grazed you!"

Chilly bin: Cooler, or esky (in Australia).

Hoover: Vacuum cleaner. e.g. "I'm going to hoover the lounge".

Mufti: means non-uniform e.g. "I'm gonna wear my new jeans on Mufti Day at school".

Knackered: worn out, e.g. "I'm so knackered after that run".

Paddock: field, e.g. "Go put the lambs in the back paddock".

Spanner: Wrench e.g. "Pass me the spanner, mate!".

Mate: Friend.

Choice: Great!  e.g. "We had some choice fish n chips last night".

Jersey, or Pullover or Jumper: Sweater.
Mozzie: Mosquito.

Sparkie: Electrician.
Chippie: Builder.

Sunnies: Sunglasses.

A Box of Fluffy Ducks: Feeling good.

Dag: Funny person e.g. "Ooh you're a bit of a dag, aren't you?!"

Jandals: Flip-flops, thongs

Buggered: Broken, not working, or tired e.g. "That washing machine is buggered" or "I feel absolutely buggered".

Pakaru: Broken, not working.
Nek minit: Next minute...

Ciggy: Cigarette.

Boot: Trunk of car.

She'll be right: It's ok, don't worry.

Hard case: Something or someone who is funny.

Piss: Alcohol, usually beer.
Pissed: Drunk.

Top shelf: Spirits (alcoholic drinks).

Takeaways: fast foods e.g. fish n chips that you don't eat on the premises.

Give us a squizz: Let me have a look.

Yeah right: A sarcastic comment to something you don't really believe.

Sunday drive: a leisurely weekend drive to somewhere scenic (hopefully).

Chur: Hello, or thanks.

Lolly: Candy.

Dairy: A small corner store, selling a selection of everything from cigarettes to icecreams and nappies.

Tomato sauce: Ketchup.

Ta: Thank you, as taught to preschoolers e.g. "When Nana gives you some cake, say Ta".

Togs: Swimwear.

Tukka: Food.

Flannel: Face Cloth or Face Washer

Yeah, nah: Yes, no, maybe, kind of. Intentionally vague. A little bit confusing for some - it's generally used when agreeing with something and kind of not agreeing with it at the same time, without being too rude. e.g. "The Aussies are great at rugby aye?" ... "Yeah, nah".

Aye: Ay, aye, eh. Used at the end of a sentence. Usually a little question. e.g. "Man it's hot aye?" Pronouned "ay". Used alot like the Canadian "eh". It's also commonly used on it's own as "pardon? Didn't hear you". 

Cheers: Thanks

Tu Meke: Awesome. Impressive. Well done. e.g. "Tu Meke job bro"

Munted: When something is broken. Or someone is Drunk. e.g. "My phone is munted", or "he was munted as".

Taking the piss:

Mare: Having a terrible time of things. A crazy situation. A night -"mare". e.g.  "It was hectic at work, then I got a flat tyre on the way home, it was such a mare of a day".

Turps: Alcohol.  e.g. "They're on the turps".

Tiki Tour: Taking a detour to get to your destination, either going the long way to do or see something or someone on the way. e.g. "We'll just do a little tiki tour round the coast, and catch up with Aunty on the way."

Stink: Disappointment. Dismay at something. e.g. "I didn't get the job", "oh stink bro, next time".

Whanau: (not slang but an everyday NZ word) Maori word for Family.

Bugger all: not much.  e.g. "what are you up to?", "bugger all mate".

Suss: to figure out or organize something. e.g. "I'll suss it bro".

Mean: Awesome. To express something as positive. e.g. "That bush walk was mean as!"

Flash: Something that looks great, new or expensive. e.g. "Look at my flash new phone".

Wicked: Another word for awesome, something amazing or spectacular. e.g. "That game was wicked mate".

Brickie: Bricklayer

Knackered: Tired, exhausted.

Rellies: Relatives (family).

Smoko: Food/Rest break during the work day.

Twink: White-out correction fluid.

 

Sweet As: This is one of the most common NZ slang terms and means "that's OK" or "I agree" or "I understand".  e.g. you say to your friend "I can't make it over to your place today, sorry" and they reply "Sweet as".

Wop wops: Out in the countryside, usually far from civilisation. e.g. "oh he lives out in the wop wops, somewhere east of Opotiki".

Cuz or Cuzzie or Cuzzie bro: Our word for cousin, but also used when referring to good friends, e.g. "g'day cuz!"

Gumboots: Our name for Wellingtons, or rubber boots, the ones you wear on a farm or when working in the freezing works.

Freezing Works: Abbatoir.

Puku: (not slang but an everyday NZ word) Maori word for tummy, stomach. e.g. "Ohh he's got a huge puku!"  

Kai: (not slang but ​an everyday NZ word) Maori word for food.

Plasters: Bandaids, wound strips.

Tramping: Hiking.

Muppet: Idiot. e.g. "He crashed his car, the muppet!"

Bach: Pronounced as "batch" and means a simple holiday home, usually by the sea or lake.

Crib: South Island name for a Bach.

Gizalook: Give me a look.

Sook: a cry-baby or wimp e.g. "Don't be such a sook, it only grazed you!"

Chilly bin: Cooler, or esky (in Australia).

Hoover: Vacuum cleaner. e.g. "I'm going to hoover the lounge".

Mufti: means non-uniform e.g. "I'm gonna wear my new jeans on Mufti Day at school".

Knackered: worn out, e.g. "I'm so knackered after that run".

Paddock: field, e.g. "Go put the lambs in the back paddock".

Spanner: Wrench e.g. "Pass me the spanner, mate!".

Mate: Friend.

Choice: Great!  e.g. "We had some choice fish n chips last night".

Jersey, or Pullover or Jumper: Sweater.
Mozzie: Mosquito.

Sparkie: Electrician.
Chippie: Builder.

Sunnies: Sunglasses.

A Box of Fluffy Ducks: Feeling good.

Dag: Funny person e.g. "Ooh you're a bit of a dag, aren't you?!"

Jandals: Flip-flops, thongs

Buggered: Broken, not working, or tired e.g. "That washing machine is buggered" or "I feel absolutely buggered".

Pakaru: Broken, not working.
Nek minit: Next minute...

Ciggy: Cigarette.

Boot: Trunk of car.

She'll be right: It's ok, don't worry.

Hard case: Something or someone who is funny.

Piss: Alcohol, usually beer.
Pissed: Drunk.

Top shelf: Spirits (alcoholic drinks).

Takeaways: fast foods e.g. fish n chips that you don't eat on the premises.

Give us a squizz: Let me have a look.

Yeah right: A sarcastic comment to something you don't really believe.

Sunday drive: a leisurely weekend drive to somewhere scenic (hopefully).

Chur: Hello, or thanks.

Lolly: Candy.

Dairy: A small corner store, selling a selection of everything from cigarettes to icecreams and nappies.

Tomato sauce: Ketchup.

Ta: Thank you, as taught to preschoolers e.g. "When Nana gives you some cake, say Ta".

Togs: Swimwear.

Tukka: Food.

Flannel: Face Cloth or Face Washer

Yeah, nah: Yes, no, maybe, kind of. Intentionally vague. A little bit confusing for some - it's generally used when agreeing with something and kind of not agreeing with it at the same time, without being too rude. e.g. "The Aussies are great at rugby aye?" ... "Yeah, nah".

Aye: Ay, aye, eh. Used at the end of a sentence. Usually a little question. e.g. "Man it's hot aye?" Pronouned "ay". Used alot like the Canadian "eh". It's also commonly used on it's own as "pardon? Didn't hear you". 

Cheers: Thanks

Tu Meke: Awesome. Impressive. Well done. e.g. "Tu Meke job bro"

Munted: When something is broken. Or someone is Drunk. e.g. "My phone is munted", or "he was munted as".

Taking the piss:

Mare: Having a terrible time of things. A crazy situation. A night -"mare". e.g.  "It was hectic at work, then I got a flat tyre on the way home, it was such a mare of a day".

Turps: Alcohol.  e.g. "They're on the turps".

Tiki Tour: Taking a detour to get to your destination, either going the long way to do or see something or someone on the way. e.g. "We'll just do a little tiki tour round the coast, and catch up with Aunty on the way."

Stink: Disappointment. Dismay at something. e.g. "I didn't get the job", "oh stink bro, next time".

Whanau: (not slang but an everyday NZ word) Maori word for Family.

Bugger all: not much.  e.g. "what are you up to?", "bugger all mate".

Suss: to figure out or organize something. e.g. "I'll suss it bro".

Mean: Awesome. To express something as positive. e.g. "That bush walk was mean as!"

Flash: Something that looks great, new or expensive. e.g. "Look at my flash new phone".

Wicked: Another word for awesome, something amazing or spectacular. e.g. "That game was wicked mate".

Brickie: Bricklayer

Knackered: Tired, exhausted.

Rellies: Relatives (family).

Smoko: Food/Rest break during the work day.

Twink: White-out correction fluid.

 

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