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  • The History of the Tokotoko The History of the Tokotoko

    The Tokotoko, or ceremonial carved Walking Stick, are generally carried by those who have authority to speak on the Marae (Meeting House). Those who carry a Tokotoko are usually of importance or high rank within a tribe.  The carving on a Tokotoko may represent a legend or ancestor and was passed down through the generations, normally given to the next in line and...
    The Tokotoko, or ceremonial carved Walking Stick, are generally carried by those who have authority to speak on the Marae (Meeting House). Those who carry a Tokotoko are usually of importance or high rank within a tribe.  The carving on a Tokotoko may represent a legend or ancestor and was passed down through the generations, normally given to the next in line and...
  • Maori Costume

    Maori Costume Maori Costume

    Maori Costume Korowai/Cloak (Kakahu) Originally the Maori cloak was made from Dog skin and fur, mixed with woven Muka (flax fibre). They were known as Kahu Kuri and were often worn with the hair side on the outside to display the extravagant style of the Chiefs status. Kahu Kuri were primarly war cloaks worn only by Chiefs. It wasn’t until the second half...
    Maori Costume Korowai/Cloak (Kakahu) Originally the Maori cloak was made from Dog skin and fur, mixed with woven Muka (flax fibre). They were known as Kahu Kuri and were often worn with the hair side on the outside to display the extravagant style of the Chiefs status. Kahu Kuri were primarly war cloaks worn only by Chiefs. It wasn’t until the second half...
  • Maori Haka Maori Haka

    The New Zealand Maori haka is an dramatic dance, first used as a form of distraction.  The words spoken during the dance are important but should not be taken out of context, nor without taking note of which tribe is using it.  So it can be difficult to just look at the words alone and try to translate the words to English.  Often...
    The New Zealand Maori haka is an dramatic dance, first used as a form of distraction.  The words spoken during the dance are important but should not be taken out of context, nor without taking note of which tribe is using it.  So it can be difficult to just look at the words alone and try to translate the words to English.  Often...
  • Maori Designs - Their Spiritual Meaning Maori Designs - Their Spiritual Meaning

    The designs used in Maori artwork on sale here at ShopNZ.com ( necklaces, pendants, wood carvings, tattoo, etc) all carry a spiritual meaning.  Early Maori did not have a written history, so their arts and crafts took on the role of being a record of spiritual values and beliefs, as well as a historical family record. Bone and greenstone jade ( pounamu) pendants and...
    The designs used in Maori artwork on sale here at ShopNZ.com ( necklaces, pendants, wood carvings, tattoo, etc) all carry a spiritual meaning.  Early Maori did not have a written history, so their arts and crafts took on the role of being a record of spiritual values and beliefs, as well as a historical family record. Bone and greenstone jade ( pounamu) pendants and...
  • Horopito

    Horopito Horopito

    Horopito is a small native New Zealand tree found throughout both main islands of New Zealand, comprising part of the under-storey of our native forests.  It is usually found in swampy areas or those with high rainfall, and is susceptible to drought, but little else. Its botanical name is Pseudowintera colorata and is a member of the Winteracae family.  Horopito is also called the pepperwood because its...
    Horopito is a small native New Zealand tree found throughout both main islands of New Zealand, comprising part of the under-storey of our native forests.  It is usually found in swampy areas or those with high rainfall, and is susceptible to drought, but little else. Its botanical name is Pseudowintera colorata and is a member of the Winteracae family.  Horopito is also called the pepperwood because its...
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